Dada, Dodo or Didi? (or are we “Waiting for GoDead?”)

Ed Park, MD #TheatricalThursdays, dr ed park, slice of life 3 Comments

For this #TheatricalThursdayI want you to tell me if I am Dada (rejecting reason for nonsense),

 

dadaart

…Dodo (a term for an idiot, as in “dumb as a dodo bird”),

 

dodo bird

or … Didi (the Pollyanna from the play, Waiting for Godot)

 

godot

 

This is a rather absurd conversation that I experienced Saturday after a round of golf with three friends. Yet with the exception of my comments, it is a conversation that I KNOW we have all had many times. This conversation represents the status quo and maybe it’s the Rosetta Stone for finally understanding Beckett’s masterpiece, Waiting for Godot.

 

SCENE: Four golfers, eating and drinking at the proverbial 19th hole.  Three are MD’s and their ages are 47, 57, 60 and 71 years old.

First I will outline the skeleton of the conversation…skeletonmuscle

Then I will add the flesh…

Finally, I will attempt to generalize the meta-conversation or subtext

SKELETON without text or meaning

Me: (talks about bad news)

Friend to left: General glib statement

Friend to right: Agreement

Friend across: Agreement

Friend to right: Statement of general hopelessness

Friend to left: Gallows-laden agreement

Friend across: Agreement and example given

Friend to right: Quorum is reached.

Me: Blanket disagreement

Friend to right: Disqualifying statement

Me: Evidence

Friend to left: Disbelief

Friend across: look of disbelief and disgust

Final resolution: general discomfort and subject change

SKELETON with text

Me: (talks about bad news)   “I can’t believe died of  sudden heart attack last week. He was only 69”

Friend to left: General glib statement:   “We all gotta go sometime”

Friend to right: Agreement   “Yes”

Friend across: Agreement      “That’s true”

Friend to right: Statement of general hopelessness:   “There’s nothing you can do”

Friend to left: Gallows-laden agreement   “I hope I die quickly”

Friend across: Agreement and example given   “I agree. I would hate to linger”

Friend to right: Quorum is reached.   “It’s better that he died rather than suffer”

Me: Blanket disagreement   “I dunno. I don’t really think it’s hopeless. I see people getting healthier and younger”

Friend to right: Disqualifying statement  “You’re a lot younger. You don’t get it”

Me: Evidence   “I’ve been tracking many patients who are improving. My own circulation is like a triathlete and I don’t exercise.”

Friend to left: Disbelief     “That’s incredible”

Friend across: look of disbelief and disgust  (what is this guy trying to pull?)

Final resolution: general discomfort and subject change  “So what about Brazil’s chances in the World Cup?”

SKELETON with text and meaning

Me: (talks about bad news)   “I can’t believe he died of  sudden heart attack last week. He was only 69”

It is sad that our friend died before he had to

Friend to left: General glib statement:   “We all gotta go sometime”

Death is the ultimate truth of life

Friend to right: Agreement   “Yes”

That is what I think

Friend across: Agreement      “That’s true”

Me too

Friend to right: Statement of general hopelessness:   “There’s nothing you can do”

I have tried to worry but I find it’s easier to just embrace hopelessness rather than live in constant fear

Friend to left: Gallows-laden agreement   “I hope I die quickly”

I am afraid to lose my faculties and suffer

Friend across: Agreement and example given   “I agree. I would hate to linger”

Not to mention being a burden to my loved ones!

Friend to right: Quorum is reached.   “It’s better that he died rather than suffer”

I see no chance of recovery from serious illness and deterioration is inevitable

Me: Blanket disagreement   “I dunno. I don’t really think it’s hopeless. I see people getting healthier and younger”

I think there is hope. My experience tells me people can improve

Friend to right: Disqualifying statement  “You’re a lot younger. You don’t get it”

We shouldn’t take you seriously because you are probably farther from dying and it’s abstract to you

Me: Evidence   “I’ve been tracking many patients who are improving. My own circulation is like a triathlete and I don’t exercise.”

I really have seen remarkable improvements to counter this hopelessness. I don’t deserve to be this healthy but I am objectively

Friend to left: Disbelief     “That’s incredible”

Kinda sounds like bullshit

Friend across: look of disbelief and disgust  (what is this guy trying to pull?)

(Is he gonna try to sell some magic pills?)

Final resolution: general discomfort and subject change  “So what about Brazil’s chances in the World Cup?”

I’ve heard enough of this. Let’s talk about something real and less depressing

Our conversation reminded me of the Samuel Beckett’s absurdist play, “Waiting for Godot”.  And in a strange bit of synchronicity, it helped me find a quote from one of my old webinars that I had forgotten.  This author of this Shmoop.com article points out that my role in our Godot-like conversation was that of Vladimir, who like me, is obsessed with the Tree of Life:

Take a look at Vladimir’s line early in Act I, when he says, “Hope deferred maketh the something sick, who said that?” As we’ve mentioned, Vladimir is referring to the biblical proverb that goes a little something like this: “Hope deferred makes the heart sick; but a desire fulfilled is a tree of life.” (Proverbs 13:12)

So I guess I am pleading guilty to having Didi-like optimism. I just hope I will have the time and the abilities to prove what I believe is true.  I leave you with the Wikipedia description of Vladimir, or “Didi” –

didi_playingtogallery

“The “optimist” (and, as Beckett put it, “the major character”) of Godot, he represents the intellectual side of the two main characters (in contrast to his companion Estragon‘s earthy simplicity).

Ed Park, MD
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Ed Park, MD

I graduated from Harvard with honors in Biological Anthropology prior to earning my Medical Degree and Masters in Public Health from Columbia University.

In 2007, I became the nineteenth patient to sign up for the use of a herbally-extracted telomerase activator.

The results were so positive that I founded Recharge Biomedical Clinic in 2008 and have since become the leading medical expert in this exciting new field of regenerative medicine treating over 1,300 patients with this exciting new telomerase activation medicine.

I won two Houston Film Festival Awards for my screenplays about Hypatia of Alexandria and Ed Brown of Kentucky.

In 2010 I wrote and self-published a Sci-Fi Graphic Novel called MAXIMUM LIFESPAN

In 2013, I wrote and published "Telomere Timebombs; Defusing the Terror of Aging"

My websites are:
http://www.lokahi.guru (where you can learn about my RECHARGE adaptogenic supplement)
http://www.rechargebiomedical.com and
http://www.telomeretimebombs.com

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Ed Park, MD
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Comments (3)

Comments 3

  1. bernie kitts

    The first step in solving a problem is accurately defining the problem. There is a lot of noise related to the subject of aging. Ironically the aged individual can possess the same mentality that they had when they were 18. The advice from the experts is about eating this or that, exercise, enough sleep and moderation. The inevitable can be delayed until another day. If a new innovation is discovered most will remain skeptical and resist change. Only about ten percent will take action once given new information. Aging is considered a natural and mandatory condition. If you could avoid aging it would be a suspicious act. By understanding the underlying cause of aging and chronic disease would be too complex for the average individual.. These root beliefs obscure the real problem and potential solutions. This is one subject that will affect all of us. Why are we complacent? We are confused. We need clarification. We need demonstration. We need a charismatic voice to convince our minds that there is a better way. Thank you Ed for all that you do for our benefit.

  2. John Bonifant

    in a word I resume alas alas abandoned unfinished the skull the skull in Connemara in spite of the tennis the skull alas the stones Cunard (mêlée, final vociferations) tennis… the stones… so calm… Cunard… unfinished…” — Samuel Beckett, Waiting for Godot (Is Lucky’s Monologue

    And some poetry fro me –

    Medula, deula oblonggotta,
    Without you there would be no notta,
    No mater, pater, sister brother,
    No Maxwell Clink in Cincinatta (aside) HA, Ha, ha

    Dr. Ed, did I ever tell you my doctor’s name was Lucky? Dr.Thomas Lucky M.D., internal medicine, A4AM member,alternative medicine,energy medicine, Ondamed, CRT, etc., etc., etc. (the “King and I” of course) alpabet soup after his name, but most importantly kinesiolosist ( He lets the patient’s body tell the doctor what is wrong with it and then he translates to the patient what the body is trying to tell the patient. Dr. Lucky can be found in Meridian, Mississippi. If you are the horse , he is the carriage, or vise versa, I’m not sure? Is it HTERT + HTERC or HTERC + HTERT?

    The point is collaborate with him. Estragon needs you.

  3. Dierdre B.

    Well, I’ll take that description of me… no matter what-I am always the optimist!! My nickname growing up was “Didi.” 🙂

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